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Web Hosting Type: Shared, Virtual, Dedicated, Co-Located - How To Choose The Right Hosting Solution
If you are starting a new web site it\'s easy to drown in the sea of alternatives offered by web hosting providers. Is it better to go for a dedicated or a shared web server? Should you choose Windows- or Linux-based hosting? Which price range is the right one for you and what are the features you can\'t live without? web_hosting_type_how_to_choose_right_solution_shared_dedicated_co-located_virtual_guide_e.jpg Photo credit: TNNhost For a beginner, such questions and concerns can be very discouraging. Web hosting is a crucial choice for your web site, so you want to pick the best solution right from the start. Choosing a web hosting type that is too powerful for your needs can cost you unneeded money and resources, while a solution that can\'t keep pace with your traffic is a serious threat to the speed and reliability of your web site. Let\'s briefly explore the different types of web hosting you can choose:
  • Dedicated: You exclusively reserve a physical web server where you host your web site and you have total control over it. CPU and RAM resources are only yours to use and you can host multiple domains or a single web site. This is one of the most expensive types of web hosting, used by large companies or Internet professionals.
  • Shared: You share server space and resources with other web sites. Your web site is may suffer from slowdowns if other web sites are sucking up the shared resources of the server machine and you may also have inconvenient neighbors such as porn or gambling web sites. This is one of the cheapest types of web hosting and also the most commonly used across the web.
  • Virtual: You get your web site hosted on a virtual machine that runs inside a shared server. Each virtual machine has its own independent operating system that can be rebooted without affecting other web sites, but it uses the shared resources of the web server (CPU, RAM, etc.) This is one of the newest types of web hosting and it fills the gap between dedicated and shared hosting. You have an independent hosting space that uses shared resources of a machine that is not exclusively yours to use nor manage.
  • Managed: You purchase a dedicated web server for your exclusive use, but you have no access to your system files, which are reserved to the hosting company. You don\'t have to worry about server management, but having no control over your web site core files and data may lead to privacy and legal issues.
  • Co-Located: You own a physical server that you can customize at your own pleasure. You can add more RAM, disk space, install a better-performing CPU, whatever. Otherwise agreed, you get no support from the hosting company. You are also fully responsible for your web site and server. This is the most expensive form of web hosting available.
  • Cloud: You host your web site on a server cluster and you purchase only the resources and traffic your web site uses in a pay-as-you-go fashion. This type of web hosting is one of the cheapest, but it also exposes you to security threats ad your web site data is accessible to company administrators and other web site owners.
This is just a quick round-up of all the web hosting alternatives at your disposal, but to identify which type of web hosting is best for your needs, I have asked Drazen Dobrovodski, webmaster of the MasterNewMedia network, to compare in greater detail all the distinctive features of each type of hosting solution and all other options at stake to help you make this important choice. ...


Read More
Web Hosting Type: Shared, Virtual, Dedicated, Co-Located - How To Choose The Right Hosting Solution
If you are starting a new web site it\'s easy to drown in the sea of alternatives offered by web hosting providers. Is it better to go for a dedicated or a shared web server? Should you choose Windows- or Linux-based hosting? Which price range is the right one for you and what are the features you can\'t live without? web_hosting_type_how_to_choose_right_solution_shared_dedicated_co-located_virtual_guide_e.jpg Photo credit: TNNhost For a beginner, such questions and concerns can be very discouraging. Web hosting is a crucial choice for your web site, so you want to pick the best solution right from the start. Choosing a web hosting type that is too powerful for your needs can cost you unneeded money and resources, while a solution that can\'t keep pace with your traffic is a serious threat to the speed and reliability of your web site. Let\'s briefly explore the different types of web hosting you can choose:
  • Dedicated: You exclusively reserve a physical web server where you host your web site and you have total control over it. CPU and RAM resources are only yours to use and you can host multiple domains or a single web site. This is one of the most expensive types of web hosting, used by large companies or Internet professionals.
  • Shared: You share server space and resources with other web sites. Your web site is may suffer from slowdowns if other web sites are sucking up the shared resources of the server machine and you may also have inconvenient neighbors such as porn or gambling web sites. This is one of the cheapest types of web hosting and also the most commonly used across the web.
  • Virtual: You get your web site hosted on a virtual machine that runs inside a shared server. Each virtual machine has its own independent operating system that can be rebooted without affecting other web sites, but it uses the shared resources of the web server (CPU, RAM, etc.) This is one of the newest types of web hosting and it fills the gap between dedicated and shared hosting. You have an independent hosting space that uses shared resources of a machine that is not exclusively yours to use nor manage.
  • Managed: You purchase a dedicated web server for your exclusive use, but you have no access to your system files, which are reserved to the hosting company. You don\'t have to worry about server management, but having no control over your web site core files and data may lead to privacy and legal issues.
  • Co-Located: You own a physical server that you can customize at your own pleasure. You can add more RAM, disk space, install a better-performing CPU, whatever. Otherwise agreed, you get no support from the hosting company. You are also fully responsible for your web site and server. This is the most expensive form of web hosting available.
  • Cloud: You host your web site on a server cluster and you purchase only the resources and traffic your web site uses in a pay-as-you-go fashion. This type of web hosting is one of the cheapest, but it also exposes you to security threats ad your web site data is accessible to company administrators and other web site owners.
This is just a quick round-up of all the web hosting alternatives at your disposal, but to identify which type of web hosting is best for your needs, I have asked Drazen Dobrovodski, webmaster of the MasterNewMedia network, to compare in greater detail all the distinctive features of each type of hosting solution and all other options at stake to help you make this important choice. ...


Read More
Web Hosting Type: Shared, Virtual, Dedicated, Co-Located - How To Choose The Right Hosting Solution
If you are starting a new web site it\'s easy to drown in the sea of alternatives offered by web hosting providers. Is it better to go for a dedicated or a shared web server? Should you choose Windows- or Linux-based hosting? Which price range is the right one for you and what are the features you can\'t live without? web_hosting_type_how_to_choose_right_solution_shared_dedicated_co-located_virtual_guide_e.jpg Photo credit: TNNhost For a beginner, such questions and concerns can be very discouraging. Web hosting is a crucial choice for your web site, so you want to pick the best solution right from the start. Choosing a web hosting type that is too powerful for your needs can cost you unneeded money and resources, while a solution that can\'t keep pace with your traffic is a serious threat to the speed and reliability of your web site. Let\'s briefly explore the different types of web hosting you can choose:
  • Dedicated: You exclusively reserve a physical web server where you host your web site and you have total control over it. CPU and RAM resources are only yours to use and you can host multiple domains or a single web site. This is one of the most expensive types of web hosting, used by large companies or Internet professionals.
  • Shared: You share server space and resources with other web sites. Your web site is may suffer from slowdowns if other web sites are sucking up the shared resources of the server machine and you may also have inconvenient neighbors such as porn or gambling web sites. This is one of the cheapest types of web hosting and also the most commonly used across the web.
  • Virtual: You get your web site hosted on a virtual machine that runs inside a shared server. Each virtual machine has its own independent operating system that can be rebooted without affecting other web sites, but it uses the shared resources of the web server (CPU, RAM, etc.) This is one of the newest types of web hosting and it fills the gap between dedicated and shared hosting. You have an independent hosting space that uses shared resources of a machine that is not exclusively yours to use nor manage.
  • Managed: You purchase a dedicated web server for your exclusive use, but you have no access to your system files, which are reserved to the hosting company. You don\'t have to worry about server management, but having no control over your web site core files and data may lead to privacy and legal issues.
  • Co-Located: You own a physical server that you can customize at your own pleasure. You can add more RAM, disk space, install a better-performing CPU, whatever. Otherwise agreed, you get no support from the hosting company. You are also fully responsible for your web site and server. This is the most expensive form of web hosting available.
  • Cloud: You host your web site on a server cluster and you purchase only the resources and traffic your web site uses in a pay-as-you-go fashion. This type of web hosting is one of the cheapest, but it also exposes you to security threats ad your web site data is accessible to company administrators and other web site owners.
This is just a quick round-up of all the web hosting alternatives at your disposal, but to identify which type of web hosting is best for your needs, I have asked Drazen Dobrovodski, webmaster of the MasterNewMedia network, to compare in greater detail all the distinctive features of each type of hosting solution and all other options at stake to help you make this important choice. ...


Read More

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PlayStation Now Rental Prices vs. Buying Full Games
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With PlayStation Now, Sony has created an instant, on demand service for video games. It provides access to some of the PlayStation 3 catalog to PlayStation 4 and Sony TV owners, effectively giving the PS4 backwards compatibility. It's a service with hundreds of titles that you can jump into and play without having to wait for them to download.

Today, the service transitioned into open beta and we got a look at the collection of games offered. There's no subscription option for PS Now; each game is priced individually for several different rental periods. But we noticed that, for some games, it would be cheaper to buy the game used than to rent it through PS Now. To put the rental prices into context, we chose several notable games, found the lowest price to buy each game, and determined how much PS Now rental time that same amount of money will get you.

GameLowest Price to BuyHow Much Rental Time Will This Buy?
Killzone 3$4.99 used at GameStop

4 hours for $2.99

Dead Rising 2$7.69 used
at Amazon
7 days for $5.99
Metal Gear Solid 4$6.99 used at GameStop4 hours for $4.99
Catherine$13.82 used at Amazon30 days for $7.99
Darksiders II$15.35 used at Amazon30 days for $14.99
Zone of the Enders HD Collection$13.10 used at Amazon7 days for $9.99
Deus Ex: Human Revolution + DLC$6.82 used at Walmart
without DLC
4 hours for $4.99
Guacamelee! + DLC$14.99 download
on PS4 with extra story content
90 days for $14.99
F1 2013$39.99 new at Amazon30 days for $22.99 + 7 days for $11.99

Of course, Sony has stated that the service is still in beta and that these prices will change before its full release. In a recent interview with GameSpot, the company revealed that it would implement a $1.99 price point during the beta for an unspecified rental period. Also notable is that, even though Sony showed off The Last of Us running through PS Now, it was not available to rent at the time of this writing.

What do you think of PlayStation Now's current prices? Let us know in the comments!

Alex Newhouse is an editorial intern at GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @alexbnewhouse
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com



PlayStation Plus Free Games of August
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Another month, another handful of games that PlayStation Plus members are getting for free. It's the gift that keeps on giving.


Magic the Gathering - Duels of the Planeswalkers 2015 Review
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Aside from being the biggest, most important card game of the past 20 years, Magic: The Gathering has become a nexus point for different types of players. Some people get a kick out of building clever, efficient decks using powerful cards. Others love the thrill of outsmarting their opponents. And the countless variations that sprung from the original game speak to even more people, such as formats that force you to build decks from a limited pool of cards. A game like Duels of the Planeswalkers, which exists to speak to the greater game-playing community outside of Magic, should reflect this diversity in play. But even though Magic 2015 makes some significant additions that people have been asking for since the first Duels was released, its feature-light foundation and odd limitations keep it from being the joyous celebration of Magic's virtues that it should have been.

Of course, Duels was always meant to be a limited experience to some extent. It's the video game version of the most popular physical card game in existence, a simulation that allows interested parties to avoid the massive money pit Magic is associated with creating. The built-in Campaign mode also means you never need to worry about finding someone to play with, because the AI is more than capable of piloting the wide variety of enemy decks the developers programmed into the game. The game exists as a convenience, leveraging the power of the medium of video games to give us a way of playing Magic on our own terms, even connecting players across the world thanks to online play.

The game interface point of view makes it look like you're playing at a real table.

Ultimately, however, the primary function of Duels of the Planeswalkers is to be a big, fat advertisement for the physical game aimed at the video game enthusiast crowd. You need only look at the menu for proof, as an entire section is dedicated to promoting Friday Night Magic, the centerpiece of Wizard of the Coast's organized play for tabletop game stores, even going so far as including a store locator. As such, Duels condenses 20 years of Magic into a complete, standalone package designed to entice people to check out the paper game. A carefully-curated selection of cards ensures players aren't overwhelmed by choices, and premade decks eases them into the game without needing to worry about deck building until they're used to playing. As always, Duels of the Planeswalkers provides neophytes with a nice little cross section of the game proper without taking anything away its core.

In this light, 2015 represents a holding pattern. You still get a Campaign mode in which you face AI opponents using your pick of premade decks, you still win cards that can enhance your base deck, and the interface is still as friendly as it ever was, breaking down the many phases that make up each turn into easy-to-understand segments. The timer still makes thinking out turns awkward; you must rush to stop the countdown before you map out your next, a necessary conceit to make sure people don't stall out in multiplayer that feels unnecessary in Campaign mode.

2015 takes you on a tour of six worlds in the Magic universe.

One previously glaring omission that 2015 remedies is in the deck-building options. Until now, you couldn't meddle much with the decks you're given: the cards you won could only be swapped in and out of the deck it was paired with. Switching between decks wasn't allowed, and though this kept with the innate simplicity of the Duels series, it deprived players of one of the cornerstones of the Magic experience. 2015 allows you to put whatever cards you want into your deck; you may even tear the whole thing apart and start from scratch if you wish. Instead of winning individual cards, you win boosters from each Campaign game which let you further customize your deck and build a virtual collection of Magic cards. As a result, newer players can gain better understanding of the game beyond what was allowed before, encouraging experimentation and on-the-fly deck testing, an aspect that should have been possible in the series in the first place.

This new, necessary feature comes with an odd limitation: You're only allowed one premade deck before you're sent on your way and left to your own devices. This doesn't sound so bad at first; after all, that's how it works in real life. You get enough cards to build your own deck, and then you add to it as you get more cards. But giving players access to a multitude of premade decks in previous games showed off the true breadth of potential play styles, and, more importantly, what's possible in Magic. Limiting players to a single deck restricts them to one type of play style no matter what. It's difficult to change gears if something doesn't work for you because most of your cards are in the two colors you started with. Changing to a new color is out of the question until you build your collection further, which you can't do until you win more matches. It's a catch-22 that is only compounded by the way in which certain decks are weak against others, and since you now can't swap out decks, you will often find yourself bottlenecked.

The primary function of Duels of the Planeswalkers is to be a big, fat advertisement for the physical game aimed at the video game enthusiast crowd.

Beyond its new deck-building options, 2015 is characterized by a complete lack of modes beyond the single-player Campaign and multiplayer matches. Previous versions of the game included extra modes like puzzle matches, Archenemy, and Sealed Deck, each of which tested Magic skills in different ways. What you have with Magic 2015 is a stripped down version of what came before, which is a shame. The multitude of different ways that people enjoy Magic beyond the base game isn't represented in the slightest.

Instead, the biggest "feature" in 2015 is a new in-game store that lets you buy premium packs made up of cards that you can't earn within the game. Perhaps the game was meant to be more like Hearthstone or Magic online, games in which you're able to pay to add to your collection, but in reality, 2015 needlessly nickels and dimes, making it far less than a complete experience.

And yet even with all these problems, Magic: The Gathering is still the fun, challenging game it's always been. Learning the complex interactions between cards is a joy, and the game is extraordinarily replayable. 2015 also features newer cards from the Theros block and the Magic 2015 core set, so fans of previous installments can play around with cards and mechanics they've never tried before, which is enticing for existing Duels fans. People who want more Campaign mode and straight-up online multiplayer of the core game may be satisfied, if annoyed by the unnecessary deck limitations. Nevertheless, they are still better served going to their local store and checking out the physical game.

Duels of the Planeswalkers 2015 gives players what they've wanted for a long time by implementing deckbuilding, but it doesn't excuse the bare-bones package and needless extra monetization. The game within the template is still as fantastic as ever, and once you get into the groove, you'll enjoy stomping your enemies with your tuned deck. It's just a shame that 2015 never aspires to be anything more than a shell and delivery service.




Rogue Legacy Review
By

What will your children inherit when you die? Your house? Your debts? Your sweet record collection? The PlayStation port of Rogue Legacy has inherited its PC parent's engaging exploration and combat, mixing some of the best elements from games like Spelunky and Castlevania: Symphony of the Night to create a fusion that makes each individual play session feel distinct while also giving you a satisfying sense of progression. It may not have gained much in the transition, but Rogue Legacy is still as great as it always was.

Rogue Legacy drops you into a randomized castle that's very reminiscent of Symphony of the Night, not only in its map and exploration style, but also in combat basics, in the feel of the movement, and even in its many enemy types. You jump and slash your way through a 2D map with a sword and a variety of secondary weapons (including an ax that's thrown in an arc), fighting the likes of skeletons, flying skulls and sword-wielding heavies in bulky armor. Obtaining the ability to double jump or dash unlocks further exploration options, allowing you to find better chests that yield better loot. Rogue Legacy is far from a cheap Castlevania knockoff, but the inspiration is clear.

Pausing the game won't save you, it will just identify all the things about to kill you.

One of the main differences between the two games is that death is permanent in Rogue Legacy. When you die, you're done, and you must start a new adventure at the beginning of the castle next time around, though certain aspects remain constant. (For example, the forest is always on the right side of the map.) You don't collect much in the way of items or weapons, but when you die, those are gone too.

When other games in this vein talk about permanent death, they really mean it. You start over from square one, and you carry absolutely nothing with you. But in Rogue Legacy that's not entirely true. Any items you collected or enemies you killed are lost, yes, and the castle will be different the next time you enter it. But all the gold you collected stays with you, passed down to your child as an inheritance. You can spend that gold on equipment, buffs or permanent stat upgrades that persist with each run through the castle. So while you're not playing as the same character throughout the game, you're still getting stronger every time you play. Admittedly this can make the early parts of the game somewhat tedious, as you probably won't be powerful enough for certain enemies no matter how skilled you are at dodging attacks. On the flip side, that same grind provides a way for less skilled players to eventually brute force their way through even the toughest bosses.

How do you want to die? Spikes, a zombie, or a giant sword?

It's this careful balance, this mix between steady progression and permanent death, that makes Rogue Legacy so enthralling. Each run feels important, because you will only see the end of the game if you can take out that next boss that you're struggling with, and you just know that this is the run, this is the time that it will all come together and you'll come out the other side alive. You've memorized the attack pattern and perfected your jump timing, so that boss is going down. But if you fail? If you fall to the castle's creatures before even reaching the boss? It wasn't all for nothing. A little piece of that character's legacy will live on, and you will carry better stats with you next time because of it.

But even though your base stats will carry on, each child--each new character you send into the castle--is still different, at least to a point. Every time you start the game, you are presented with three random descendents to choose from, and they vary in class and traits. Classes are your typical role-playing fare, with options like the barbarian, a class with a large amount of health, or the assassin, who is low on health but has a higher chance of critical hits. Traits are a little different, as they're random attributes that could have wildly different effects--or no effect at all--on how that character operates. Many traits are clever even when they make gameplay more of a chore, such as having a hero that is colorblind (thus making the game black and white) or a heroine who is a hypochondriac, which makes the damage numbers spilling from your character exceptionally larger than their actual value. Other traits are more pointless and even sophomoric, such as the I.B.S. trait that makes you fart randomly. Still, these neat elements of randomness help mix up the individual playthroughs.

Kids, this is why you don't do drugs.

All three PlayStation versions of the game (PS3, PS4 and Vita) are virtually identical, with the Vita version only missing out on one ultimately pointless feature, a trait that induces "random muscle spasms" and makes your controller vibrate. All three are wonderful versions of the game, though the text on the Vita version can be blurry and hard to read at times. They also contain extra content that was added to the PC version after its initial release, including new traits, new rooms, and, most noticeably, remixed versions of the game's bosses that provide a good challenge to anybody who seeks them out. Rogue Legacy supports Sony's cross buy and cross save features, letting you pick up your saved PS4 game on your Vita with relative ease.

It's almost unfair to compare Rogue Legacy to other games that emphasize permanent death. It doesn't have the secrets of Spelunky and it's more predictable than The Binding of Isaac, yet at the end of every game comes a desire to hop right back in, spend your gold on some upgrades and rack up more monster kills, something the game encourages with a challenging new-game-plus option that appears after the credits roll. Whether you play it on your home console or on the go, it's worth exploring Rogue Legacy's castle again and again and again.




GS News - Sony Makes 41.8m Profit; PlayStation Now Beta Launches!
By

Sony want your feedback on PlayStation Now while they roll in their piles of PlayStation money, and Capcom is hoisted up by Dead Rising 3 sales!


Watch BioWare's Second Creepy Teaser Video for Its New Project
By

Update: BioWare has released a second teaser video through its You've Been Chosen website. The new "Spark" video shows a young man whose phone is called repeatedly by an unknown number, which he ignores in order to continue drawing a ring-like shape on a napkin. A ring of fire from the first teaser is briefly shown on-screen (this time with blue flames) before his phone explodes and a hooded figure is shown to be watching him from outside.

Original Story: BioWare has release a new "Nightmare" teaser trailer for what would appear to be its next project. You can watch the 40-second video above, which shows a man awaken in his bed from a nightmare consisting of broken lamps, a ring of fire, a suit-wearing man with smoke in place of a head, and other creepy things that make me glad I'm not watching it at night.

The video was sent out to select fans by email along with the text "You've Been Chosen" and a link to the website youve-been-chosen.com. The website is home to very little currently, but it does offer the following bit of text in relation to the new video: "The time is near. They are watching. Your power is rising. Cologne, Germany. You've Been Chosen. Watch the new 'Nightmare' teaser from BioWare."

Cologne is the location of Gamescom, the annual games convention scheduled to run this year from August 13-17.

Eurogamer notes that there looks to be an ARG tied to the tease that's currently underway involving a fictitious search for someone named Henna. Flyers seeking her out are reportedly being handed out at San Diego Comic-Con. All Games Beta reports an image in the email contains "Shadow Realms" in its filename; that's a name BioWare's owner, Electronic Arts, trademarked earlier this year.

BioWare is known to be working on a new IP in addition to a new Mass Effect game. The new Mass Effect is in the works at BioWare Montreal, while BioWare Edmonton, the team behind the original Mass Effect trilogy--as well as the first Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic--are focused on the new IP. It was said to already be playable as of last December, and last month executive producer Casey Hudson said the new IP would tell "contemporary stories."

It was reported by USGamer earlier this year that BioWare planned to collaborate with FailBetter Games, developer of Fallen London, on a new project. It's possible that's what this new game is, but unless more information is revealed ahead of Gamescom--which is possible between SDCC and the ARG--we'll have to wait at least a few more weeks to have a better grasp of what the game is.

What are you hoping this tease turns out to be? Let us know in the comments.

Chris Pereira is a freelance writer for GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @TheSmokingManX
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com



New $30 Halo-Themed PC Mouse Is Oddly Not a Gaming Mouse
By

Should the prospect of owning what Logitech calls the "world's fastest mouse" not entice you due to its distinct lack of Master Chief-ness, Microsoft has just the mouse for you. The company today announced the limited-edition Halo-themed Wireless Mobile Mouse 3500; for $30, you can own a mouse adorned with the Halo name and the Master Chief himself.

Strangely, considering the target demographic for this is presumably people who play games and are fans of Halo, this is not a gaming mouse. The 3500 is a fairly run-of-the-mill wireless mouse that carries an MSRP of $30, but is sold for as little as $16 on Amazon if you're willing to make do with one whose color is officially described as "Loch Ness Gray."

By most accounts it's a fine mouse, but it lacks the sort of gamer-centric features you'd expect from one that carries the Halo branding. Even something as simple as extra side buttons (the 3500 has only the two in addition to its mouse wheel) that I can't imagine living without are nowhere to be found.

Microsoft claims the mouse lasts up to eight months with a single AA battery, offers a slot for transporting its USB receiver, and uses the company's BlueTrack Technology. This is said to provide "remarkable tracking on virtually any surface" including carpet, though it won't work on mirrors or clear glass.

The wireless Halo 3500 mouse goes on sale in October, and can be preordered now through GameStop. When it launches, it will also be available through the Microsoft Store and other retailers.

Halo's presence has never been especially heavy on PC; there was a two-year gap between the Xbox and PC releases of Combat Evolved, and a two-and-a-half-year wait before Halo 2 made it to PC from Xbox. Since then, of the seven Halo games released, only Halo: Spartan Assault has made it to PC, with not even Halo Wars--a seemingly perfect fit for PC as a real-time-strategy game--being released on computers. Neither of the next two Halo games, Halo: The Master Chief Collection and Halo 5: Guardians, has been confirmed for any platforms but Xbox One.

Chris Pereira is a freelance writer for GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @TheSmokingManX
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com




FIFA 15: Gameplay Features - Agility and Control
By

Captured from FIFA 15 gameplay, see closer control and more realistic player movement, new ball physics and crunching physical challenges.


Hyrule Warriors - Darunia and a Hammer Gameplay Trailer
By

Check out this Hyrule Warriors gameplay trailer showcasing Darunia and a Hammer.


Xbox One's Digital-Only Killer Instinct Finally Comes to Retail, Includes TJ Combo
By

If you've held out on picking up the new Killer Instinct for Xbox One because you wanted to own a physical disc, you're in luck. Microsoft has announced the Killer Instinct: Combo Breaker Pack, a physical release of the fighting game coming in September.

Killer Instinct was initially released as a digital-only game alongside the Xbox One last November. Players could download a free version that allowed access to a single fighter, or buy the full game to receive the six fighters available at launch and two more that were subsequently released as DLC.

The Combo Breaker Pack consists of the eight fighters from Season 1, as well as one of the characters, TJ Combo, coming as part of the Season 2 expansion. The package will be launched at retail for $20--the same price as the digital version of Season 1--on September 23 with the unseemly box art to the right.

Microsoft confirmed with GameSpot that the Combo Breaker Pack includes a physical disc, and not a download code. TJ Combo, on the other hand, will only be available as a download using a code included with the game.

Season 2 is in the works at Iron Galaxy Studios, which took over development duties after the game's original developer, Double Helix, was acquired by Amazon earlier this year. It's expected out "later this year" and so far only has one confirmed character besides TJ Combo: Maya, another returning character from earlier in the series.

Chris Pereira is a freelance writer for GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @TheSmokingManX
Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com




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